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Svobody Boulevard

Images

ID:
121
Place
Lviv
Date:
1914-1915
Technique:
Photograph (printed on paper)
Size of the resource:
Unknown
Creator
Unknown
Collection
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.
Copyright
Library of Congress, Washington
Publisher
Unknown
Description
Karl Ludwig Street (today the odd-numbered side of Svobody Blvd.) photographed in the times of the Russian occupation of Lviv in the First World War. This can be deduced from the Cossack riders proceeding in the direction of the Opera Theater. The street in the photograph still shows the tram tracks, which no longer exists today. In the forefront of the picture is an old-fashioned electric street light. To the left, the picture clearly shows the character of store decoration widespread in Lviv prior to Soviet occupation. A notable distinction is that practically all shops have wooden facades that have not survived until the present day. Typical Lviv residents of the time are walking along a sidewalk, a Jew in a long black coat with a walking stick and a black hat stands out among them. Karl Ludwig Street was home to a very high number of hotels, but only a few of theme were functioning in 1914. In addition to The Esplanade (No. 19), and The Bristol (No. 21), from whose side the street was photographed, The Monopole (No. 25) was also open (its sign can be seen on the left). The neighboring building No. 27 was home to The Bellevue hotel, coffeehouse and cinema, which was active in 1907-1914.
Tags:
Hetmanski Waly, hourses, people on the streets, Opera Theatre
Category:
Streets